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Serge Attukwei Clottey: The New York Times: Desert X Artists Dig Beneath the Sandy Surface

Serge Attukwei Clottey: The New York Times: Desert X Artists Dig Beneath the Sandy Surface

Artworks in this year’s biennial, scattered around the Palm Springs area, explore issues of land rights, water supply and more.

By Jori Finkel

Published March 12, 2021

 

Clottey’s humble choice of material speaks to the droughts and water supply issues that threaten Southern California as well as his native Ghana. He cuts plastic pieces from so-called Kufuor gallons, colorful containers used in Ghana for storing water, and stitches them together with wire.

The Guardian: 'Water is sacred': 10 visual artists reflect on the human right to water

The Guardian: 'Water is sacred': 10 visual artists reflect on the human right to water

The UN declared access to water and sanitation a human right a decade ago, but 785 million people worldwide still have no water close to home

Ten photographs marking the 10th anniversary of access to water and sanitation being declared a human right by the UN have been commissioned from 10 visual artists by the charity WaterAid to show the impact of clean water on people’s lives.

Globally, 785 million people – one in 10 – still lack access to water close to home and 2 billion people – one in four – don’t have a toilet of their own.

 

Tomorrow’s World by Serge Attukwei Clottey (Ghana)

“I wanted to create art that would represent the anguish and violence that go along with our planet’s problems. People do not realise how their own suffering is tied to the environment: to their long trip to fetch water, or their discomfort under the heat when the streets have no trees. Ghana is facing some of the most detrimental consequences from climate change and water shortages. Yet the government does nothing, so I have taken it upon myself to educate through art.”

VOGUE: This Artist Is Wearing His Mother’s Clothing to Promote Social Change in Ghana: Serge Attukwei Clottey

VOGUE: This Artist Is Wearing His Mother’s Clothing to Promote Social Change in Ghana: Serge Attukwei Clottey

This Artist Is Wearing His Mother’s Clothing to Promote Social Change in Ghana

BY CHIOMA NNADI

 

Ghanaian Independence Day falls on March 6 and last year artist Serge Attukwei Clottey marked the occasion with a boundary-pushing act of self-liberation. He walked through the streets of Accra, the nation’s capital, in his deceased mother’s clothes with members of his art collective—also in their mothers’ clothing—marching by his side in solidarity. Wearing vibrantly printed traditional dress, the mostly male crew drew hundreds of onlookers out of their homes and onto the street, sending shockwaves through Ghanaian society where the conversation around gender fluidity is only just beginning to open up and homosexuality is illegal.

 

The Guardian: Serge Attukwei Clottey: the artist urging African men to dress as women

The Guardian: Serge Attukwei Clottey: the artist urging African men to dress as women

Serge Attukwei Clottey walked through Ghana’s capital city in his dead mother’s clothes to honour her memory – and to highlight injustice against women. It is the latest step in his art collective’s mission to create social change

The Guardian: The Ghanaian turning thousands of discarded plastic bottles into art: Serge Attukwei Clottey

The Guardian: The Ghanaian turning thousands of discarded plastic bottles into art: Serge Attukwei Clottey

A new exhibition showcases a local artist using jerry cans to draw attention to the country’s pollution crisis

The New York Times: Technology Expands the World for African Artists

The New York Times: Technology Expands the World for African Artists

Serge Attukwei Clottey: “I think technology helps African artists to reach many people in the global art space,” he said by email. “For example, I’ve been getting many residency opportunities from all over the world because people always see my work online.”

Technology Expands the World for African Artists

By Ginanne Brownell Mitic

March 24, 2016

 

The Ghanaian artist Serge Attukwei Clottey said that thanks to the Internet, where he posts his artistic productions on his Instagram account, he not only was offered — and took — the chance to study in Brazil but he also was contacted by one of his future collectors, who is based in California.

“I think technology helps African artists to reach many people in the global art space,” he said by email. “For example, I’ve been getting many residency opportunities from all over the world because people always see my work online.”